Ivan Hurst's exploration of Genealogy

Intro

Family group at Deer Leap

The Bignells and the Pomeroys of Broadwindsor

The Bignells and the Pomeroys of Broadwindsor

This is not my research, but it is my family. More importantly, it is how I became hooked on Family Tree research.

This tree was created by the hard work and research of Robin Pomeroy and "Bobby" Barbara Ann Pomeroy nee Hood, over many years, the old fashioned way, without the benefits of the Genealogy websites we have today and their associated records

I have merely put their data on line for them, with their knowledge and permission, firstly on Ancestry, and now here. Transcribing one of the hard copies they circulated to the family, my Mum's copy, into database record format and sharing with the world.

Additional contributions to the original work came from Pamela Shaftoe in respect of the descendants of Mary Brown. From Audrey Johnson, a lot of contributions on the Newport Pomeroys. From Colin Pomeroy, much about the descendants of Charles Cleal Pomeroy, and from Estella Nobles those of Thomas Pomeroy. Original information about the descendants of Charles Edward Pomeroy came from Geraldine Nottley-Jones and was amplified by Peggy Hurst, nee Pomeroy. There were also contributions throughout from Chris Pomery.

Family Tree

Family Tree

 

 

 

 


 

 

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An improbable tree

The improbable tree

The improbable tree

 

 


 

 

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One place study

One place study

Millbrook, Hampshire

My interest in one place studies started with the 1841 census at Millbrook Hampshire. According to MyHeritage there are only 3496 records for 1841, which increased to 12,863 for the 1891 census. Millbrook, Redbridge, and Nursling were all adjacent rural communities with very low density populations. I have been following the enumerators described roues to try to establish residences and plot them on a map. Communities were fairly static in the early part of the census taking period before WWI. There had been the earlier mass migrations caused by the industrial and agricultural revolutions, exasperated by the enclosure laws. I am expecting to find some families say it close proximity to the first census and have a tendency to marry the girl/boy next door. Well, near neighbours. By studying one census location from 1841 to 1911, I hope to be able to shed some light on he social change as the population again starts to migrate again and the area becomes urbanised and absorbed into Southampton.

 

 


 

 

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One name study

One name study

 

 

 


 

 

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Welcome

Welcome to the genealogy part of my website.

It is currently under development and will be subject to ongoing change.

It is intended to include information about my Family Tree, stories about people and places, including histories, together with information about One Name and One Place studies.

Just to get you started is a name tool for you to investigate.